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Multitasking seems like a great way to get a lot of work done at once. However, research has shown that our brains are not capable of handling multiple tasks as we would like to think they are. Some researchers suggest that multitasking can reduce productivity as much as 40%.

Therefore, it is essential for us to know how to set proper goals and strategize efficiently to achieve goals when there are a lot of work to be finished. Let’s learn about the SMART goals, a method that can be used to achieve goals by efficient time allocation.

S: Specific

The S in a SMART goal stands for ‘Specific’. A specific goal means that the goal is set by the 5 Ws: With, Whom, What, Why, and Where. For example, a goal such as “I need to go to the gym more often” is not a specific goal. A specific goal is “I have to go to the gym at 7:00 AM before going to work at least 6 times a week for 6 months and work out three different parts of the body.” Specific goals can be more motivating, which can increase the speed of achievement.

M: Measurable

The M in a SMART goal stands for ‘Measurable’. When setting a goal, it’s important to make the goal measurable, as it can provide a clear sense of the progress. From the sales perspective, an abstract goal would be “I will attract more customers this month,” whereas “I will attract 10 more customers per week compared to last month” would be a measurable goal.

A: Attainable

The A in a SMART goal stands for ‘Attainable’. It is important to be realistic and set achievable goals. Setting a goal that exceeds individual limits may be helpful in improving productivity, but setting goals that are not realistically achievable can have a negative effect. For example, rather than setting unrealistic goals such as “we will breakthrough the entire U.S. market by 2021,” a CEO who dreams to make a global company would likely say that “as the company made 3% growth last year, this year’s goal is to make 5% growth in the market.”

R: Relevant

The R in a SMART goal stands for ‘Relevant’. Being relevant means that your goal is consistent and aligned with other goals within the organization. It is great to set goals and work hard to achieve them, but if goals have nothing to do with the current work, it can even hinder growth. If the current team leader of the development department sets the goal of becoming the team leader of the planning department, he may not be able to concentrate on the existing development work and disturb productivity. Therefore, it is very important to understand whether the goals that are set by the individual are suitable for both the company and the individual.

T: Time-bound

The T in a SMART goal stands for ‘Time-bound’. Time-bound means that a goal is set with a deadline. Working within a certain timeframe often increase productivity. Goals with no deadlines can sometimes lead to procrastination. For example, a goal such as “I’m going to lose some weight” may not push someone to put in the effort to lose weight because there is no deadline. However, having a goal like “I will be on a diet so that I can shoot a body profile on August 15th” has a set deadline, which will motivate a person to achieve this goal more successfully.